Question: Do Miscarried Babies Go to Heaven?

Heaven

Question: What about the babies of women who have miscarriages? If we are born in sin and need to be baptized as babies by the faith of our parents, will those babies be in heaven through their parents faith? Can we know from Scripture?

Will miscarried or aborted children go to heaven? My belief is … yes. Absolutely!

Let’s make a Scriptural case:

  • In Jeremiah 1:5, God tells the prophet, “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you.” Scripture tells us that there is an eternal part of us that God knows intimately even in the womb – maybe even before we’re in the womb! (“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you.”)
  • And it’s not just knowing us in the womb, Scripture tells us of God’s involvement in procreation. Now certainly procreation involves a mother and a father, an egg and a sperm. God, of course, ordained that. But Scripture tells us that the creator and sustainer of all life continues to be involved in this procreative and developmental act. Psalm 139:13 says, “it was you who formed my inward parts; you knit me together in my mother’s womb.” (That’s another argument, by the way, against elective This baby is not just the father’s or the mother’s; it’s God’s! And until he gives us his expressed permission to take this life, why are we usurping his divine authority.)
  • A third example of the eternality of a fetus’s ongoing life occurs in 2 Samuel. David and Bathsheba infamously have an extramarital affair which results in a scandalous pregnancy, not to mention the murder of Bathsheba’s husband. As a consequence, God takes the baby. Sounds horrible, sounds so unjust and unfair … unless you have an eternal perspective. If the goal of life is to live as long we can in this broken world, then this could be easily judged as unjust. If the goal of life is to live eternally with God, then this baby was eternally and immediately blessed. And David knew this. David was the one who experienced human pain and earthly grief, and yet, he was buoyed by this Biblical truth, saying, “Since he has died, why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I shall go to him, but he will not return to me” (2 Samuel 12:23, emphasis added). David is saying that the child is safe, living eternally with God, and David knows that one day he shall go to be with his child (and with his Lord) in heaven.

Our questioner is absolutely right. We are all born into sin. Even babies. Think about it: they are inherently selfish. Their cries are “feed me,” “change me,” “hold me.” We don’t have to teach them to take another child’s toy; we have to teach them to share. As David confessed in Psalm 51:5, “I have been evil from the day I was born; from the time I was conceived, I have been sinful.” But even the murderous, adulterous sin into which David fell didn’t keep this infant from God’s love.

  • And that’s a next point of comfort to those who ponder this question: The character of God. He is gracious and merciful; slow to anger; and abounding in steadfast love.”

In Christ’s Love,

a guy who by this standard,

has a miscarried baby or two

waiting for him someday

 

 

 

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